Unnerving Magazine Special Stephen King Edition.

Unnerving Magazine King Issue
Unnerving Magazine, King Issuehttps://www.unnervingmagazine.com/

I have a story in this called “His Name is Love,” based on the Stephen King story, “The Man Who Loved Flowers.”

Here is an excerpt.

I’ve been asked to dinner a lot. I reek of dead flowers. I like men, even after everything that’s happened. I mean I like women more, but I don’t see myself in that way. I want to take off my face, have a nap. I always want to nap. Sometimes I want to nap forever, lie curled up on a bed of petals and just go to sleep, dream that I’ve remembered my name. But that’s just guilt talking. Dusk isn’t a good time for any of us.

Now go and subscribe to Unnnerving. It’s killer.

NB reviews Collision.

Thanks to Linda Hepworth at NB magazine for this 5-start review of Collision. Cool that Keith Rosson’s illustrations get a nod, too.

Collision by JS. Breukelaar, illustration by Keith Rosson
Collision by JS. Breukelaar, illustration by Keith Rosson

Without writing a separate review of each of these tales it’s difficult to do full justice to the quality of this author’s writing, but what it is very easy to do is to urge you to read these haunting, disturbing and thought-provoking stories for yourself. If you enjoy the weird, the quirky and the unexpected, I’m sure you won’t be disappointed.

Breach Magazine Reviews Collision

While I’m catching up on news, here is Breach magazine’s review of my upcoming collection, Collision.

Stories are ruthless, nothing is safe—even the child who offers a lollipop and loses a wrist to the Clint Eastwood dog. Breukelaar experiments with the Gothic and queries the queer. Bedded within the tales is a voluptuous energy that turns pages. Tables pirouette in a blink and, before you know it, the story is eleven shades grimmer.

Thanks to Eugen Bacon and Breech Mag for the words.

You can pre-order Collision here and everywhere.


Best books of 2018 – LitReactor Staff Pics.

Image by Joshua Chaplinsky

Best books of 2018? I read very few books last year. I don’t know why I read so little. The ones I did were mainly for work. I read a lot of student work, edited manuscripts for clients and my own. Getting Collision edited and ready for printing took a lot of my time, partly because the folks from Meerkat are almost as anal as I am. Or at least pretend to be when I know they are just being patient. Anyway here are my pics for 2018 over at LitReactor. And while you’re there, check out Parts 1 and 2, pencil at the ready to jot down the list for your local bookstore.


Reflecting back on World Fantasy2018, Baltimore

Where do I start? Probably with a huge huge shout-out to CreateNSW who made travel to WFC Baltimore possible by awarding me the Artist Quick Response Travel Grant.

Create NSW JS Breukelaar

This is the first time I’ve gone to World Fantasy with any assistance, and it lifted a whole lot of stress and allowed me to concentrate on networking, learning, making new friends and connecting with old ones. Another first for me this time was having my publisher front and centre. I owe a huge debt of gratitude and respect to Tricia Reeks, CEO of Meerkat Press for everything she did, and is. Finally, it was such a joy to reunite with my agent Matt Bialer and my brother-from-another planet Seb Doubinsky who is also part of the Meerkat family. I don’t want to write too many spoilers here because of a forthcoming article at LitReactor.com, but yeah, hi-jinks did ensue.

Here are some of the pictures, but they don’t tell the whole story. This is the convention that keeps giving for sure, in terms of friends, colleagues, and inspiration. I sold books. I connected with new readers. I read new work by some talented people. I panelated with, um, Alliete de Bodard. I drank a teensy bit too much with Ms Warren and Mr Jeffrey Ford. I slept way too little. Can’t wait to go back.


My hostel room the day before I moved to the Con Hotel. Luckily this was the bed I didn’t sleep in.
Mr D and me at WFC! Seb Doubinsky is my brother-from-another planet, but also the renowned French-Danish author of Lost Signals and the famous City-States cycle that has a cult following internationally. Seb pumped me to Meerkat and the rest is history. I love this smart and savvy author, not only for who he is, but also for who he makes me think I am – a real writer. I t was a joy to see him knocking them dead on his panels and at Barcon, where if his reputation did not already precede him, it does now.
Image may contain: 3 people, including Tricia Reeks and JS Breukelaar, people smiling, people sitting, people standing and indoor
Tricia Reeks, CEO of Meerkat Press, agent and padre Matt Bialer and me at WFC Baltimore getting business done.
Image may contain: 5 people, people smiling, people standing
JS Breukelaar panellating with Aliette de Bodard and others in front of terrifyingly packed crowd. First panel of the con – Families and Fear in SF! #trembling. Image courtesy of Meerkat Press.

Goodreads Giveaway of Collision = Free books!

So this is happening—thanks to the good people at Meerkat Press.

Goodreads Book Giveaway

Collision by J.S. Breukelaar

Collision

by J.S. Breukelaar

Giveaway ends November 12, 2018.

See the giveaway details
at Goodreads.

Enter Giveaway




Success! I snagged the CreateNSW Quick Response Grant – World Fantasy 2018, here I come!

Create NSW JS BreukelaarMy first grant, so. When the guy from CreateNSW called me and told me, I literally cried and he was embarrassed. It was a moment. Anyway, thank you CreateNSW. I’m goin’ to Baltimore, my third World Fantasy, and the first one not on my own dime, entirely.  Can’t wait to meet my new publisher, Tricia Reeks of Meerkat and to reunite with my amigo Seb Doubinsky, and hang out with my people. I always get so much out of these cons—meeting new readers, bonding with new viewers, scoring invitations to contribute to anthologies. But the best thing about this World Fantasy is getting to support some fellow Australian authors, especially the amazing Kaaron Warren, who is Guest of Honor. I plan to hang out in NYC for three short days afterward, where I’ll be reading at Gotham writers Workshop and elsewhere.

I’ll be tweeting about my road to WFC Baltimore so watch that space.


Another Literary Mashups class about to begin at LitReactor: Sept. 13

The walls are coming down: sign up here.

Thanks to authors like George Saunders (weird ghosts), Jeff Ford (fantastical horror), Jeremy Robert Johnson (biznoirro), Angela Slatter (fairy tales with bite) and Kelly Link, whose stunning fantasy, “Stone Animals,” was included in Best American Short Stories, the lines dividing one set of genre conventions from another, can be blurred to stunning effect—and that’s what today’s publishers and editors are looking for.

The genre barbarians are at the gate, and getting all up in the guts of what used to be called ‘literary fiction,’ and the result is dark fantasy with sf elements, crime fiction with ghosts, vampires with artificial intelligence—the sky is literally the limit, and the old rules no longer apply.

Of that sounds like you—fascinated with Japanese horror yet knee-deep in a western sf novel, or if your crime story draws from Norse mythology, or American folk tales, or your fairy tales features robot romance—consider yourself home. Some of the most in-demand fiction today includes the best elements from multiple genres and styles in one big mosh-pit of surreal Gothic hellraising.

J.S. Breukelaar is the acclaimed author of the futuristic wild west horror novel, American Monster; Aletheia, a noir ghost-story with a sci-fi twist, and the upcoming collection, Collision, which includes dystopian ghost tales, Halloween war stories, alien gender-bending, body-horror romance, and a zombie novella for the AI age.

And, over four weeks of intense writing, plus exposure to some of the ground-breaking genre-benders making waves today—you will discover new techniques to pull the most powerful elements from countless genres—into a story with the kind of heart and soul editors are looking for.