Locus reviews “Collision: Stories”

Very grateful for this starred review of Collision: Stories by Paula Guran at Locus Magazine.

Whether her name is familiar or not, her debut collection, Collision: Stories, should be on your “must read” list. Breuke­laar, an American living in Sydney, Australia, writes in a clean, incisive style with razor-sharp opening hooks, while blending the literary, the speculative, and the weird. The earliest of the 12 stories was published in 2011 and there are three originals. All are unsettling. If any themes tie them together, it may be that the real and the unreal can and do coexist and that, however dire life may be, there is usually at least a modicum of optimism to be found. Another unifying fac­tor is that the characters are all so normal and knowable while also being completely abnormal and unpredictable.

Kinokuniya Books to Host Australian Release of *Collision: Stories*

Collision: Stories—J.S. Breukelaar in conversation with Angela Slatter, at Kinokuniya

Collision: J.S. Breukelaar in conversation with Angela Slatter
Join us for an evening with author J.S. Breukelaar as she talks about her latest book, Collision: Stories. With introduction by award-winning author Angela Slatter.

RSVP now →

When: Thursday, 28 March 2019, 6 pm – 8 pm
Where: Books Kinokuniya Sydney, Level 2, The Galeries
500 George Street (opposite QVB)
Sydney NSW 2000 Tel: 02 9262-7996

*Collision: Stories* available worldwide.

Collision: STories by J.S. Breukelaar

In the next couple of hours/days I’ll be posting some reviews, interviews and just general stuff about Collision, my new collection of stories and a novella out from Meerkat Press. For now though, thanks are due to Meerkat Press, especially Tricia Reeks, who is as smart and unstoppable as they come. Matthew Bialer, I literally wouldn’t be here without you. Seb Doubinsky, Angela Slatter, John Langan, Stephen Graham Jones, Kathe Koja, thanks doesn’t cut it. To author/illustrator Keith Rosson for the illustrations. Thanks to editors of some of the early stories and editors everywhere.💐 Thanks to early reviewers and podcasters for letting me ramble. But readers, thank you above all. You’re the ones I do this for. And to my first readers, John Breukelaar Troy Palmer, Isabella Breukelaar, Jack Breukelaar, endless love. 💘

You can purchase Collision: Stories from the usual places. Or click on the banner above for more options.

Here is a teaser.

Rogues Bay 3013, Collision by J.S. Breukelaar.

NY Journal of Books Reviews Collision.

Townsend Walker over at NY Journal Of Books had this drop today – 15 February EST, the day Collision: Stories is unleashed on the world. Needless to say, I’m honored, stoked and you know, overwhelmed.

“J. S. Breukelaar is a writer of obvious talent, demonstrated over and over in this collection.”
The 12 stories in this collection feature horror, fantasy, and weirdness. The stories and the author are promoted as such. But the reader will probably find the more realistic stories to be her best, and many are quite fine— “Union Falls,” “Fairy Tale,” “Fixed,” and War Wounds.”

This is Horror boosts Collision

“No stranger to horror and dark fiction, this collection from Breukelaar showcases her best short fiction to date, and a new novella makes it one of the most anticipated titles for 2019. “

Bob Pastorella, This is Horror.

Thanks to This Is Horror for this signal boost. Had a great time chatting with Bob and Michael last time I was on this killer podcast. Listen to Anya Martin talk about sleeping with monsters, now!

Alvaro Zinos-Amaro reviews Collision

Alvaro Zinos-Almaro reviews Collision, beautifully, at Intergalactic Medicine Show. More than honored by this.

Though she wasn’t born in the South, her stories evoke for me the same drawling sense of pocket-universe skewedness as Howard Waldrop’s best, perhaps filtered through a more contemporary sensibility; a time-lapsed version of Stephen Graham Jones’s back-country, tooth-bearing fictions, with disquieting details lovingly blown up and lingered on; and all of this enlivened by injections of surrealism a la Leonora Carrington, with touches of William Gibson-esque techno-estrangement. It’s a mind-expanding brew.