Unnerving Magazine Special Stephen King Edition.

Unnerving Magazine King Issue
Unnerving Magazine, King Issuehttps://www.unnervingmagazine.com/

I have a story in this called “His Name is Love,” based on the Stephen King story, “The Man Who Loved Flowers.”

Here is an excerpt.

I’ve been asked to dinner a lot. I reek of dead flowers. I like men, even after everything that’s happened. I mean I like women more, but I don’t see myself in that way. I want to take off my face, have a nap. I always want to nap. Sometimes I want to nap forever, lie curled up on a bed of petals and just go to sleep, dream that I’ve remembered my name. But that’s just guilt talking. Dusk isn’t a good time for any of us.

Now go and subscribe to Unnnerving. It’s killer.

NB reviews Collision.

Thanks to Linda Hepworth at NB magazine for this 5-start review of Collision. Cool that Keith Rosson’s illustrations get a nod, too.

Collision by JS. Breukelaar, illustration by Keith Rosson
Collision by JS. Breukelaar, illustration by Keith Rosson

Without writing a separate review of each of these tales it’s difficult to do full justice to the quality of this author’s writing, but what it is very easy to do is to urge you to read these haunting, disturbing and thought-provoking stories for yourself. If you enjoy the weird, the quirky and the unexpected, I’m sure you won’t be disappointed.

Breach Magazine Reviews Collision

While I’m catching up on news, here is Breach magazine’s review of my upcoming collection, Collision.

Stories are ruthless, nothing is safe—even the child who offers a lollipop and loses a wrist to the Clint Eastwood dog. Breukelaar experiments with the Gothic and queries the queer. Bedded within the tales is a voluptuous energy that turns pages. Tables pirouette in a blink and, before you know it, the story is eleven shades grimmer.

Thanks to Eugen Bacon and Breech Mag for the words.

You can pre-order Collision here and everywhere.


Best books of 2018 – LitReactor Staff Pics.

Image by Joshua Chaplinsky

Best books of 2018? I read very few books last year. I don’t know why I read so little. The ones I did were mainly for work. I read a lot of student work, edited manuscripts for clients and my own. Getting Collision edited and ready for printing took a lot of my time, partly because the folks from Meerkat are almost as anal as I am. Or at least pretend to be when I know they are just being patient. Anyway here are my pics for 2018 over at LitReactor. And while you’re there, check out Parts 1 and 2, pencil at the ready to jot down the list for your local bookstore.


Goodreads Giveaway of Collision = Free books!

So this is happening—thanks to the good people at Meerkat Press.

Goodreads Book Giveaway

Collision by J.S. Breukelaar

Collision

by J.S. Breukelaar

Giveaway ends November 12, 2018.

See the giveaway details
at Goodreads.

Enter Giveaway




Another Literary Mashups class about to begin at LitReactor: Sept. 13

The walls are coming down: sign up here.

Thanks to authors like George Saunders (weird ghosts), Jeff Ford (fantastical horror), Jeremy Robert Johnson (biznoirro), Angela Slatter (fairy tales with bite) and Kelly Link, whose stunning fantasy, “Stone Animals,” was included in Best American Short Stories, the lines dividing one set of genre conventions from another, can be blurred to stunning effect—and that’s what today’s publishers and editors are looking for.

The genre barbarians are at the gate, and getting all up in the guts of what used to be called ‘literary fiction,’ and the result is dark fantasy with sf elements, crime fiction with ghosts, vampires with artificial intelligence—the sky is literally the limit, and the old rules no longer apply.

Of that sounds like you—fascinated with Japanese horror yet knee-deep in a western sf novel, or if your crime story draws from Norse mythology, or American folk tales, or your fairy tales features robot romance—consider yourself home. Some of the most in-demand fiction today includes the best elements from multiple genres and styles in one big mosh-pit of surreal Gothic hellraising.

J.S. Breukelaar is the acclaimed author of the futuristic wild west horror novel, American Monster; Aletheia, a noir ghost-story with a sci-fi twist, and the upcoming collection, Collision, which includes dystopian ghost tales, Halloween war stories, alien gender-bending, body-horror romance, and a zombie novella for the AI age.

And, over four weeks of intense writing, plus exposure to some of the ground-breaking genre-benders making waves today—you will discover new techniques to pull the most powerful elements from countless genres—into a story with the kind of heart and soul editors are looking for.



Maria Haskins reviews *Aletheia*

THank you to Canadian author Maria Haskins for her kind words about meh book:

Like a steam-train, it gathers momentum in the telling, and while the first chapters draw you into the world of the story, allowing you to get to know the characters, everything soon takes a turn I did not see coming. And towards the end, the story is just edge-of-your-seat GRIPPING. Horror and landscape mix with memory and desire in a way that is riveting.



“Horror is the genre that rose from the grave… “

Record sales in horror fiction, according to the Daily Telegraph? Thank you Stranger Things, Andy Muschietti’s film adaptation of Stephen King’s It? And maybe a bunch of other factors too. Like this, from Alexander Gordon Smith, over at Tor.com:

Horror makes us children again, in the best possible way. We’re incredibly resilient when we’re kids, because our imaginations are so vast, so powerful. They cannot be defeated. When we go through bad things, we have the emotional intelligence to recover, because we know that anything can happen. If there can be monsters under the bed then there can be miracles, too.

Or, in my twisted take on horror’s weirdness over at LitReactor:

All these stories instill a kind of terror in the reader, but the kind of terror where the fever dream is not so much to defeat It, as to see It, touch It. Make It stick. Because without It, what are we?

Vale Harlan Ellison. You mattered to me. I included his 1965 story, “Repent Harlequin, said the Ticktock Man” in my favorite dystopian stories over at LitReactor.

Speaking of LitReactor, Peter Derk’s Cormac McCarthy birthday tribute is pretty cool. This one took me way, way down the rabbit hole.