Cover Art for Aletheia

Aletheia, JS Breukelaar cover art Ben Baldwin

Revealing Ben Baldwin’s final cover art for Aletheia, out soon from Crystal Lake Publishing.

Pretty much one of the most gorgeous covers I’ve seen, still can’t believe it’s mine. Thanks to Joe Mynhardt from Crystal lake for setting this up.
aletheia-front-3

In other news, just found out I’m on the Weird Fiction panel at World Fantasy Con in Columbus, Ohio with two of my heroes – Ellen Datlow and Michael Kelly. Unfortunately won’t have the actual book to flaunt—copies won’t quite be ready yet—but I’ll be reading from it anyway.

Writing the Weird resumes August 30

Writing the Weird JS Breukelaar

I’ll be teaching weirdness over at LitReactor again soon. August 30. Spaces left—hope to see you there.

Three of my students that I know of have sold their stories from the class. Here’s some hype:

[This] LitReactor class was unforeseeably phenomenal… It’s the most I’ve ever learnt in a writing class, and if all LitReactor classes are as genuinely relevant and engaging as that, then they might be on to some kind of creative revolution.” —Emila B.

Aletheia edit done and gone!

I write this in bed. I am reviewing books, having a look at courses I’ve been invited to teach, waiting on a call-back, and on a submitted story. And did I mention that I’m in bed?

I mean, specifically, bed at 1 pm, surrounded by cords and open laptops and phones and legal pads and my kindle and a stack of other books, including the wonderful Patricide, by D. Foy?

But getting back to my first point. In bed.

When my son was in junior high he and his friends would add, “in bed,” to the end of every sentence. Like the old guy at the pub who does the ‘Said the actress to the bishop.’ So (and thanks TP for the prompt), someone’d say, ‘I hate it when you get here early and you have to wait for Mr. Weiss,’ and the kids’d be all, ‘IN BE-ED!’

That kind of thing. Which is where I am. In bed. Because the edit’s in—and the visionary Ben Baldwin is working on the cover—this is a novel about memory, about a woman who returns home to her lake-town and gets bitten by the beast of memory. I read Borges of course, for inspiration, but also Kandell’s work on memory, more McCarthy (in fact, my agent-angel emailed me after reading a draft and said I am to Gila Monsters what Cormac is to watermelons—bless him) and Bronte and watched and finally abandoned American Horror Story at “Hotel.” My husband stepped up again as beta-reader. My son helped with spread-sheets, concept art, and comments like, ‘novel writing looks really fun.’ And sometime toward the end of the process, one of the people I love most in the world died, and I got shortlisted for a residency and a couple of prizes, and sold a new story, and have been asked to teach at a prestigious workshop and one best friend is miles away across this adopted country of ours, and another lost her job, and a sister went to Spain and tracked Don Quijote for me, and another was at the bedside of the person who died, as he lay dying, and kissed him for me, and he smiled.

Hands Across Australia

One of the astonishing pics taken by my friend Sarah Klenbort as she travels around this country with her family. Those shadows are camels, btw, on Cable Beach. Here are more, a freshie in the night, and rowing down the Drysdale River. More here.

Tunnel Creek croc

I’ll be visiting SK in Darwin in a couple of weeks, haven’t been around this country as much as I should have. Both of us are displaced New Yorkers, or replaced, or misplaced. Those camels up there speak to being in this place however I am, to this shadow of homelessness that follows me wherever I go.

ALone on Drysdale River

Gutted Anthology out from Crystal Lake

With stories from Ramsey Campbell, Clive Barker, Neil Gaiman, Paul Tremblay, John F.D. Taff, Lisa Mannetti, Damien Angelica Walters, Christopher Coake, Josh Malerman, Mercedes M. Yardley, Brian Kirk, Amanda Gowin, Richard Thomas, Maria Alexander, Stephanie M. Wytovich and Kevin Lucia. With a foreword by Cemetery Dance magazine founder Richard Chizmar.

Here is an early review. and another one here, singling out Mercedes M. Yardley’s story, “Water Thy Bones,” as “one of the high points of the collection, an odd sort of tale that explores the beautiful side of horror – which, as it turns out, is bone deep (not skin deep). It wasn’t only an interesting story, but and interestingly told story.”.

Looks like a collection that’s going to make quite a splash, makes me proud to be a very recent addition to the Crystal Lake family. Here’s where you buy it.

Status update

I write my first story for the new year. 1500 words start to finish and I can’t seeing it growing much longer. I have some longer ones in the breach, but I’m trying a new process. 2015 was a tough year for writing, sooner it’s put behind me the better.

Tough times

When the going gets tough, the tough make coffee and drink it staring over their computers through the heat-fogged window and blame everything on the contractors next door with their hammering and drilling and talk back radio, until the contractors have gone home and the hammering has stopped and the tough are still staring through their heat-fogged windows and it’s time to pour some wine.