2020? Pandemapocalypse

So whatever I said about you, 2019, I take it back. I always thought there was something ominous about the way you looked at me in the rear view with your staring eyes and squiggly sideways eyebrows, and, well here we are.

Apart from feeling sad all the time, I’m one of the okay ones. I live in Sydney and healthcare is good and we’re staying indoors, mostly…. my teaching at both Western Sydney U. and U Sydney has moved online, so I still have a job. I’m one of the lucky ones. Apart from feeling sad all the time, I sometimes remember to hope, to wonder what it will be like when we all emerge? What the world will look and feel like, and how long it will take us to stop mourning those who didn’t make it, to stop grieving for the very normalcy that helped get us here in the first place.

This is Horror boosts Collision

“No stranger to horror and dark fiction, this collection from Breukelaar showcases her best short fiction to date, and a new novella makes it one of the most anticipated titles for 2019. “

Bob Pastorella, This is Horror.

Thanks to This Is Horror for this signal boost. Had a great time chatting with Bob and Michael last time I was on this killer podcast. Listen to Anya Martin talk about sleeping with monsters, now!

Unnerving Magazine Special Stephen King Edition.

Unnerving Magazine King Issue
Unnerving Magazine, King Issuehttps://www.unnervingmagazine.com/

I have a story in this called “His Name is Love,” based on the Stephen King story, “The Man Who Loved Flowers.”

Here is an excerpt.

I’ve been asked to dinner a lot. I reek of dead flowers. I like men, even after everything that’s happened. I mean I like women more, but I don’t see myself in that way. I want to take off my face, have a nap. I always want to nap. Sometimes I want to nap forever, lie curled up on a bed of petals and just go to sleep, dream that I’ve remembered my name. But that’s just guilt talking. Dusk isn’t a good time for any of us.

Now go and subscribe to Unnnerving. It’s killer.

“Horror is the genre that rose from the grave… “

Record sales in horror fiction, according to the Daily Telegraph? Thank you Stranger Things, Andy Muschietti’s film adaptation of Stephen King’s It? And maybe a bunch of other factors too. Like this, from Alexander Gordon Smith, over at Tor.com:

Horror makes us children again, in the best possible way. We’re incredibly resilient when we’re kids, because our imaginations are so vast, so powerful. They cannot be defeated. When we go through bad things, we have the emotional intelligence to recover, because we know that anything can happen. If there can be monsters under the bed then there can be miracles, too.

Or, in my twisted take on horror’s weirdness over at LitReactor:

All these stories instill a kind of terror in the reader, but the kind of terror where the fever dream is not so much to defeat It, as to see It, touch It. Make It stick. Because without It, what are we?

Vale Harlan Ellison. You mattered to me. I included his 1965 story, “Repent Harlequin, said the Ticktock Man” in my favorite dystopian stories over at LitReactor.

Speaking of LitReactor, Peter Derk’s Cormac McCarthy birthday tribute is pretty cool. This one took me way, way down the rabbit hole.

Margo Lanagan speaker at Australian release of “Aletheia” at iconic Galaxy Bookstore

Aletheia_Launch_Invite_JS BreukelaarOne day I’d like to put together an anthology of twenty (or a hundred) perfect fantastical tales. “Singing My Sister Down” by Margo Lanagan (Black Juice), will be in there for sure. I reached out to Ms Lanagan a couple years back after staring at this story in the VanderMeer Weird Compendium and just staring at it and thinking how it changed me. I found out we lived in neighboring suburbs of Sydney. And now, here we are, and she’s going to be introducing Aletheia at its Aussie launch. Kind of hard to get my head around how cool it is.

So that.

And then a couple days later I shoot down to Melbourne for my very first Continuum, where I’ll be on the some panels and a reading on Sunday morning. Here are my slots.

Saturday 10th June
3pm Secondary Worlds in Weird Fiction
J.S. Breukelaar, Kat Clay, Michelle Goldsmith, Stephanie Lai

4pm Genre Conventions
J.S. Breukelaar, Earl Livings, Jason Franks, Laura E Goodin, Likhain

Sunday 11th June
10am Reading
Corey White,Michael Pryor, J.S. Breukelaar.

In September I’ll be appearing at Conflux 13 in Canberra, and later in year at World Fantasy Convention in Austin, TX – more info on those last two as I get it.

Doing everything I can to get my collection edited and off to pub by end June. That’s out in October.

ALETHEIA released, reviews coming in.

Last Friday was release day for Aletheia. Seemed like it would never happen and then when it did, it felt like I always mostly knew it would. I hugged a bunch of folks in the book’s acknowledgments page, people who made the book both necessary and possible either in terms of what they mean to me, or what they did to get the book into shape, and often both. Right off the bat now and always, there’s Matthew Bialer, best agent in the world, period, and also Joe Mynhardt from Crystal Lake Publishing, who took on this big project and kept it on track and who is yawping it from the rooftops with all the barbaric power of the independent publishing groundswell carrying so many of us hysterically uncategorizable authors into hearts and minds. And my family, John, Jack, Isabella and Troy—they also get to see their names twice. And they also know why.

And to get the ball rolling, here’s a review by WC Marchese, over at Unnerving Magazine

‘… like Sons of Anarchy mixed with a sprinkle of Neverwhere by Neil Gaiman’

I’ll take it!