Aletheia reviewed at Black Static Magazine.

Here is part of what Peter Tennant, over at Black Static had to say about Aletheia.

This is a densely written, complicated and ambitious novel, touching on themes of memory and betrayal. There are many things that stand out, not least of which is the superb characterisation. We get the back story of each character, the tragic events that shaped both Thettie and Lee, and how they have tried to cope with the consequences, the way in which Doc Murphy cunningly insinuated himself into the life of the Harpur clan, making himself indispensable, but always with an eye on the main chance. We get cameos of his delightful henchmen, Homer and Lyle, who are as memorable as they are nasty, and we are introduced to Thettie’s two sons, Grif and Archy, with their different but complementary personalities, each of them larger than life. And of course there’s Vernon, who has a lot of chutzpah for a lizard. And let’s not forget the strange, enigmatic Bryce, a young girl who may be Frank’s agent or possibly an emissary of the lake itself. These few and a host of others, each with their own distinguishing idiosyncrasies and character traits, interact and play off against each other, adding twists and turns to the story, including one monumental one that I didn’t see coming and regarding which I can only salute the author’s audacity…. [A]t the heart of the story is the ghost who flits in and out of events, facilitating the plot at certain crucial moments, an enigmatic deus ex machina gathering power and biding its moment to act directly, and when it does act the world is remade…. Beautifully written, with a magical evocation of place and keen awareness of how the borderlines between reality and the outré are so easily blurred, filled with engaging and memorable characters speaking dialogue that scintillates, and packed with enough ideas for a half dozen ordinary novels, this was an impressive performance from J. S. Breukelaar and a book that will almost certainly reward further readings.

You’ll have to subscribe to read the whole thing. I just did, partly as a way of saying thank you, but also because Black Static is one of my favorite magazines, with great authors in it every month.

 

Updates coming, and a conversation at LitReactor

Writing the Weird with JS Breukelaar
Over the next few days, I’ll be updating the hell out of this blog. News coming thick and fast. This just in:
I talk to LitReactor’s Rob Hart about all kinds of things. Weird fiction, my new novel Aletheia and working with Crystal Lake Publishing. Here.

LitReactor is my home away from home. I teach a class on Weird Fiction there, write an occasional column. My next class is on August 10.

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Margo Lanagan speaker at Australian release of “Aletheia” at iconic Galaxy Bookstore

Aletheia_Launch_Invite_JS BreukelaarOne day I’d like to put together an anthology of twenty (or a hundred) perfect fantastical tales. “Singing My Sister Down” by Margo Lanagan (Black Juice), will be in there for sure. I reached out to Ms Lanagan a couple years back after staring at this story in the VanderMeer Weird Compendium and just staring at it and thinking how it changed me. I found out we lived in neighboring suburbs of Sydney. And now, here we are, and she’s going to be introducing Aletheia at its Aussie launch. Kind of hard to get my head around how cool it is.

So that.

And then a couple days later I shoot down to Melbourne for my very first Continuum, where I’ll be on the some panels and a reading on Sunday morning. Here are my slots.

Saturday 10th June
3pm Secondary Worlds in Weird Fiction
J.S. Breukelaar, Kat Clay, Michelle Goldsmith, Stephanie Lai

4pm Genre Conventions
J.S. Breukelaar, Earl Livings, Jason Franks, Laura E Goodin, Likhain

Sunday 11th June
10am Reading
Corey White,Michael Pryor, J.S. Breukelaar.

In September I’ll be appearing at Conflux 13 in Canberra, and later in year at World Fantasy Convention in Austin, TX – more info on those last two as I get it.

Doing everything I can to get my collection edited and off to pub by end June. That’s out in October.

Michelle Garza reviews Aletheia for This is Horror.

There are monsters that dress in the skin of men, and hauntings that go beyond your average apparitions, alive and threatening. Women turn to lizards, dead dogs can see, and the things that drive men mad can step from their imaginations into broad daylight or slink around by the light of the moon just beyond the sight of their own eyes.

Heartfelt thanks to Michelle Garza for this dark love. Read more at This is Horror.

This is Horror – finally.

TIH 145 J.S. Breukelaar on Aletheia, Crystal Lake Publishing, and Teaching Creative Writing

 

So I’ve been a fan of this show for years – I even wrote about it at Volume 1: Brooklyn and now I’m on it. You want a show that covers craft, art, suffering, conferences, story, inspiration, desperation, awards, missing out on awards, revision, publishing, self-publishing—this is it. Stephen Graham Jones, Paul Tremblay, Angela Slatter, Jeremy Robert Johnson, Scott Nicolay—they’ve all had their two cents worth and this is mine, PART 1 and PART 2.

Thanks to Michael David Wilson and Bob Pastorella for having me.

 

 

I tell Nick Kaufman the scary bits

Author Nick Kaufman has me on his blog to talk about the scariest part of writing Aletheia.

It couldn’t end at that moment of total narrative collapse, but it was really difficult for me to see beneath its broken structure at that point. And there was another thing. It wasn’t just the story that had broken. It wasn’t just the characters who were looking at me in gobsmacked revulsion at what I’d done to their world. I was looking back at myself, and wondering what the story, as I’d told it, made me? I wanted to tell the characters that the story had broken my heart, too.

Read more…

Angela Slatter asks me about Aletheia, and I say….

 

Angela Slatter is the WFC award-winning author of The Girl with No Hands and Other Tales, Sourdough and Other Stories, The Bitterwood Bible and Other Recountings, Winter Children and Other Chilling Tales, A Feast of Sorrows: Stories and Black-Winged Angels, as well as Midnight and Moonshine and The Female Factory (both with Lisa L. Hannett). She has won a World Fantasy Award, a British Fantasy Award, a Ditmar, and five Aurealis Awards, as well as being a finalist for the Norma K. Hemming Award.

She dug Aletheia. She had me on her blog.

Aletheia: JS Breukelaar