Cover Reveal for Collision: Collected Stories.

col-cover-CREVICE-FINAL-02-small-537x800This is the cover for the upcoming collection. I love it, and thanks in tonnage to the folks at Meerkat for a cover that reveals as much as it conceals. Read more about the collection here.

A collection of six of J.S. Breukelaar’s darkest, finest stories plus six new works, including the uncanny new novella, “Ripples on a Blank Shore.” Relish the gothic strangeness of “Union Falls,” the alien horror of “Rogues Bay 3013,” the heartbreaking dystopia of “Glow,” the weird mythos of “Ava Rune.” Plus an introduction by award-winning author, Angela Slatter. It’s clear that this collection from the author of American Monster and the internationally acclaimed and Aurealis Award finalist, Aletheia, announces a new and powerful voice in fantastical fiction.

“Raining Street” picked up by Black Static Magazine.

The “Yes” just in my inbox yesterday – super super psyched to be picked up by this smart mag out of the UK, and for a story about snake beans! Thanks to Andy Cox from TTA Press for digging it, heaven-sent beta reader, Angela Slatter and the Thorbys crowd who workshopped this with me.

 

Writing classes in Sydney at Centre for Continuing Education, University of Sydney

Looking forward to this live workshop. Sydney’s f/sf writers: I know you’re there. Come hang out. Be with your people a couple hours a week for six weeks. It’ll be the making of you, promise.

Do you harbor a love of the fantastic, whether science fiction, horror, weird crime, urban fantasy, steampunk, magic realism and more? Are you, like the Australian legend, Terry Dowling an “imagier”, someone who loves to imagine worlds liberated from the constraints of reality? Have you a novel idea that’s out of this world, or a story that’s just a little weird? Maybe Buffy’s your idea of comfort food; or you can you recite The Raven in Elfish, or would kill to be able to write Urban Fantasy like Seanan McGuire? Is that climate change fiction novel burning a hole in your Scrivener? If so, you’re in good company. Thanks to Pulitzer Prize winners like George Saunders and Margaret Atwood, epic fantasists like Neal Stephenson, Brandon Sanderson, and George RR Martin, or the quietly off-kilter Kelly Link and our very own Margo Lanagan, the walls between genre and literary fiction have come down and there has never been a better time to write, read or publish stories that are out of this world.

Continue reading Writing classes in Sydney at Centre for Continuing Education, University of Sydney

Aletheia reviewed at Black Static Magazine.

Here is part of what Peter Tennant, over at Black Static had to say about Aletheia.

This is a densely written, complicated and ambitious novel, touching on themes of memory and betrayal. There are many things that stand out, not least of which is the superb characterisation. We get the back story of each character, the tragic events that shaped both Thettie and Lee, and how they have tried to cope with the consequences, the way in which Doc Murphy cunningly insinuated himself into the life of the Harpur clan, making himself indispensable, but always with an eye on the main chance. We get cameos of his delightful henchmen, Homer and Lyle, who are as memorable as they are nasty, and we are introduced to Thettie’s two sons, Grif and Archy, with their different but complementary personalities, each of them larger than life. And of course there’s Vernon, who has a lot of chutzpah for a lizard. And let’s not forget the strange, enigmatic Bryce, a young girl who may be Frank’s agent or possibly an emissary of the lake itself. These few and a host of others, each with their own distinguishing idiosyncrasies and character traits, interact and play off against each other, adding twists and turns to the story, including one monumental one that I didn’t see coming and regarding which I can only salute the author’s audacity…. [A]t the heart of the story is the ghost who flits in and out of events, facilitating the plot at certain crucial moments, an enigmatic deus ex machina gathering power and biding its moment to act directly, and when it does act the world is remade…. Beautifully written, with a magical evocation of place and keen awareness of how the borderlines between reality and the outré are so easily blurred, filled with engaging and memorable characters speaking dialogue that scintillates, and packed with enough ideas for a half dozen ordinary novels, this was an impressive performance from J. S. Breukelaar and a book that will almost certainly reward further readings.

You’ll have to subscribe to read the whole thing. I just did, partly as a way of saying thank you, but also because Black Static is one of my favorite magazines, with great authors in it every month.

 

Updates coming, and a conversation at LitReactor

Writing the Weird with JS Breukelaar
Over the next few days, I’ll be updating the hell out of this blog. News coming thick and fast. This just in:
I talk to LitReactor’s Rob Hart about all kinds of things. Weird fiction, my new novel Aletheia and working with Crystal Lake Publishing. Here.

LitReactor is my home away from home. I teach a class on Weird Fiction there, write an occasional column. My next class is on August 10.

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